mydarkenedeyes:

Abstract paintings by Paul Bennett.


ashmackenzie:

This was an assignment for school, we had to come up with a cover for a future issue of American Illustration and incorporate the issue number in as well. I decided to do 88, focusing on the relationship between an image and its viewer. 

ashmackenzie:

This was an assignment for school, we had to come up with a cover for a future issue of American Illustration and incorporate the issue number in as well. I decided to do 88, focusing on the relationship between an image and its viewer. 


(via zezaay)


(via foggy-child)


sailorboy1264:

Lago verde - Grüner See - Austria

(via foggy-child)


(via foggy-child)




Of all sad words of tongue or pen, the saddest are these, ‘It might have been.
John Greenleaf Whittier, Maud Muller - Pamphlet (via kari-shma)

(via quote-book)


A man’s face is his autobiography. A woman’s face is her work of fiction.
Oscar Wilde (via pfemd9)

(via quote-book)


urhajos:

‘Sharktopus’ by Filiskun

urhajos:

Sharktopus’ by Filiskun


It’s not who you are underneath, but what you do, that defines you.

(via airpiratealynn)


25 Napping Facts Every College Student Should Know

beben-eleben:

  1. It makes you smarter
    According to Dr. Matthew Walker of the University of California, napping for as little as one hour resets your short-term memory and helps you learn facts more easily after you wake up.
  2. Abandon all-nighters
    Foregoing sleep by cramming all night reduces your ability to retain information by up to 40%. If you can, mix in a nap somewhere to refresh your hippocampus.
  3. It doesn’t mean what you think
    If you know you have to pull an all-nighter, try a “prophylactic nap.” It’s a short nap in advance of expected sleep deprivation that will help you stay alert for up to 10 hours afterwards.
  4. You can’t avoid that down period after lunch by not eating
    Human bodies naturally go through two phases of deep tiredness, one between 2-4 a.m. and between 1-3 p.m. Skipping lunch won’t help this period of diminished alertness and coordination.
  5. Pick the right time
    After lunch in the early afternoon your body naturally gets tired. This is the best time to take a brief nap, as it’s early enough to not mess with your nighttime sleep.
  6. Hour naps are great
    A 60-minute nap improves alertness for 10 hours, although with naps over 45 minutes you risk what’s known as “sleep inertia,” that groggy feeling that may last for half an hour or more.
  7. But short naps are best
    For healthy young adults, naps as short as 20, 10, or even 2 minutes can be all you need to get the mental benefits of sleep, without risking grogginess.
  8. Drink coffee first
    The way this works is you drink a cup of coffee right before taking your 20-minute or half-hour nap, which is precisely how long caffeine takes to kick in. That way when you wake up, you’re not only refreshed, but ready to go.
  9. The NASA nap
    A little group called NASA discovered that just a 26-minute nap increases performance by 34% and alertness by 54%. Pilots take advantage of NASA naps while planes are on autopilot.
  10. Can’t sleep? Don’t stress
    Even if you can’t fall asleep for a nap, just laying down and resting has benefits. Studies have found resting results in lowered blood pressure, which even some college kids have to worry about if they are genetically predisposed to high blood pressure.

Read More

P.S. Breaking news: USA =/= free world. There are free countries outside of America and they are not lead by the president of USA.



ruineshumaines:

Fireflies on the Water (2002), by Yayoi Kusama.

Fireflies on the Water isan installation made of 150 lights, mirrors and water.
It offers an out-of-this-world experience from the confines of a modest room paneled with mirrors and adorned with 150 tiny beads of light deliberately suspended throughout the compact space. Upon entering the room, there’s an illusionary effect that gives the impression of infinite space reflected on all sides and in the two inches of water that flows below.

July 12 - September 30, Whitney Museum.


(Previously blogged: Infinity Mirror Room)

(via awkwardrandy)